According to a WMO report, record heat made half of Delhi’s population more vulnerable

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r25IQAEAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAADwa3LeAAHT6fCFAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC According to a WMO report, record heat made half of Delhi's population more vulnerable
NEW DELHI, INDIA – APRIL 3: A man drinks water from the water bottle during a hot weather, as the heat wave conditions prevailed in Northern India with the maximum temperature settling at 38.9 degrees Celsius, five notches above the normal, on April 3, 2016 in New Delhi, India. The minimum temperature yesterday was recorded at 21.6 degrees Celsius while the maximum had settled at 37.3 degrees Celsius. (Photo by Raj K Raj/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)

According to a report by the World Meteorological Department, between March and May, Delhi experienced five heatwaves with temperatures that broke records and reached as high as 49.2 degrees Celsius. This increased the vulnerability of the city’s half-population, which lives in low-income, informal settlements.

The study revealed that greenhouse gas concentrations are now at all-time highs. After a brief decline brought on by lockdowns, fossil fuel emission rates are currently higher than they were prior to the pandemic. According to it, the 2030 emission reduction commitments must be seven times more ambitious to meet the Paris Agreement’s 1.5 degree Celsius temperature objective.

“Climate science is increasingly able to show that many of the extreme weather events that we are experiencing have become more likely and more intense due to human-induced climate change. We have seen this repeatedly this year with tragic effect. It is more important than ever that we scale up action on early warning systems to build resilience to current and future climate risks in vulnerable communities. That is why WMO is spearheading a drive to ensure Early Warnings for All in the next five years,” said WMO Secretary-General Prof Petteri Taal

The warmest seven years on record occurred in the last few. The probability that the annual mean temperature will temporarily be 1.5 degrees Celsius higher than the average between 1850 and 1900 is 48% for at least one year in the upcoming five years. Increasing global warming

“Floods, droughts, heatwaves, extreme storms and wildfires are going from bad to worse, breaking records with alarming frequency. Heatwaves in Europe. Colossal floods in Pakistan. Prolonged and severe droughts in China, the Horn of Africa and the United States. There is nothing natural about the new scale of these disasters. They are the price of humanity’s fossil fuel addiction,” said UN Secretary-General Ant nio Guterres.

“This year’s United in Science report shows climate impacts heading into uncharted territory of destruction. Yet each year, we double-down on this fossil fuel addiction, even as the symptoms get rapidly worse,” Guterres said in a video message.

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